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Serena Ryder -The Art of Falling Apart Canadian Tour

The Arden Theatre 5 St. Anne Street, St. Albert, Alberta

ROOTS/POP Friday, October 7 & Saturday, October 8, 2022 7:30 P.M. Tickets starting at $62; prices do not include GST, handling charges, and fees. Toronto-based vocal powerhouse Serena Ryder is a platinum-selling artist adored by fans, peers and critics alike, in part due to her raw and earnest songwriting, and beautifully electric live performances. She has won seven prestigious JUNO Awards, including the 2022 Adult Contemporary Album of the Year for her recent record: The Art of Falling Apart. Serena has received several further accolades, including Canada’s Walk of Fame Allan Slaight Music Impact Honour, the Margaret Trudeau Mental Health Advocacy Award, and a Canadian Screen Award for Achievement in Music–Original Song. With The Art of Falling Apart, Serena invites listeners to join her mental wellness journey and helps us understand the importance of sitting with the uncomfortable moments and the wisdom in their messages. Over a driving pop sound bursting with irresistible rhythms, pulsing bass lines, and the full range of her powerful and expressive voice, she pulls listeners through her own winding, transformational journey, detailing despair, toxic relationships, and breakdowns alongside hope, joy, and big, big love. https://www.serenaryder.com/ https://www.facebook.com/SerenaRyder/ https://www.instagram.com/serenaryder/ https://twitter.com/serenaryder

$62.00

Serena Ryder -The Art of Falling Apart Canadian Tour

The Arden Theatre 5 St. Anne Street, St. Albert, Alberta

ROOTS/POP Friday, October 7 & Saturday, October 8, 2022 7:30 P.M. Tickets starting at $62; prices do not include GST, handling charges, and fees. Toronto-based vocal powerhouse Serena Ryder is a platinum-selling artist adored by fans, peers and critics alike, in part due to her raw and earnest songwriting, and beautifully electric live performances. She has won seven prestigious JUNO Awards, including the 2022 Adult Contemporary Album of the Year for her recent record: The Art of Falling Apart. Serena has received several further accolades, including Canada’s Walk of Fame Allan Slaight Music Impact Honour, the Margaret Trudeau Mental Health Advocacy Award, and a Canadian Screen Award for Achievement in Music–Original Song. With The Art of Falling Apart, Serena invites listeners to join her mental wellness journey and helps us understand the importance of sitting with the uncomfortable moments and the wisdom in their messages. Over a driving pop sound bursting with irresistible rhythms, pulsing bass lines, and the full range of her powerful and expressive voice, she pulls listeners through her own winding, transformational journey, detailing despair, toxic relationships, and breakdowns alongside hope, joy, and big, big love. https://www.serenaryder.com/ https://www.facebook.com/SerenaRyder/ https://www.instagram.com/serenaryder/ https://twitter.com/serenaryder

$62.00

David Myles Trio – on Tour Across Canada

The Arden Theatre 5 St. Anne Street, St. Albert, Alberta

DAVID MYLES TRIO - ON TOUR ACROSS CANADA Wednesday, October 19, 2022 7:30 P.M. Tickets starting at $35; prices do not include GST, handling charges, and fees. Our most fundamental questions—about how to exist in this world we share, and how best to love the people we love—so often keep us awake at the end of the day, at a loss for answers. From the plaintive opening notes of David Myles’ It’s Only a Little Loneliness, the New Brunswick-based songwriter testifies that he’s no exception: “I could try to explain what goes on in my brain, but I’d have to pretend that I knew,” he sings on “Certain.” On his introspective 15th studio album, Myles establishes himself as a seeker—of paths, of new sonic expressions, of God. Concrete answers, however, elude him the same as they elude the rest of us. All of that seeking reveals one clear conclusion, though: we are bound to each other. “But it’s late at night, and I’m reaching for the light,” he continues over soft, arpeggiated guitar on the album’s opening track. “And I want to spend my whole life with you.” “It's the kind of thing you say to yourself when you're feeling a bit down: ‘It’s only a little loneliness,’” Myles says about the album’s title on a drive through northern New Brunswick. “But then at the same time, you know—it's actually quite a big thing. It's overwhelming. You try to tell yourself it's not a big deal but it feels quite fundamental. And you realize, ‘I need people. I need a community. I need my friends. I need my family.” That’s clear from songs like the sweet “If I Lost You,” simultaneously uplifting and heavy as Myles deals with the fact that everything must end, and what that means for relationships based in love. On the smoky “Mystery,” he addresses the enigmatic magnetism of opposites attracting, reminding listeners that those who are different from us broaden our perspectives and make our lives richer. Sometimes it takes something massive, though—a rending of the fabric of one’s reality—to see our interdependence on one another clearly enough to inspire profound changes. In 2018, Myles came down with a sudden illness that had him worried that his life and ability to make music were in jeopardy; in 2020, the world changed overnight, upending his life and career along with everyone else. “My worst fear was to have the career drop,” Myles says. “And then, for reasons beyond my control, it dropped for me. And I didn't die. And it didn't all fall apart.” It took a lot of soul-searching to get to this point, where he could look back on the past few years and understand what it had taught him. During this period his bandwidth for putting on any kind of airs was completely depleted, and he realized that with the time he has, he has to be 100% himself, which meant following those thoughts that kept him up at night, learning how to best express them, and confronting them through music. “All of a sudden, I could talk about God in my songs, and I could talk about the mystery of relationships and love and confusion and loneliness,” Myles says. In 2021, the Juno-nominated album That Tall Distance offered an instrumental expression of Myles’ feelings about these questions. It’s Only a Little Loneliness brings his voice and words into the mix, using the same recording approach, with each contributing player afforded as much time as they need to lay down their parts at home and complete the picture. The result is a collection that flows naturally, a whole that proves more than the sum of its dynamic and singular parts. For Myles, it was imperative that percussion form the beating heart of the record, and Joshua Van Tassel’s intricate work drives songs like “Walk With Me,” as Myles seeks to fill his spiritual void. The virtuosic Leith Fleming-Smith appears on organ and Wurlitzer, and Asa Brosius provides the dreamy title track dobro solo and gossamer pedal steel for the cover of country heartbreak standard “Making Believe.” Elsewhere, Dean Brouillard provides the crucial low end on bass; Andrew Jackson blows trombone; and Aaron Davis provides the glowing piano work on curtain-closer “Solitaire.” All over the album, the voices of dear friends—Rose Cousins (“Making Believe”), Breagh Isabel (“If I Lost You”), and Reeny and Haliey Smith (“Mystery,” “Walk With Me,” and the slinky and soulful “You Can’t Hurt Me”)—drive home that important sentiment: we need each other to get through, even if it’s just a little loneliness. Over these past years of isolation, Myles has continued to seek connection via his “not-so-late night talk show” Myles From Home on YouTube, which has since become a popular podcast by the same name. Myles From Home has featured a diverse selection of guests including Jeremy Dutcher, Shad, Alex Cuba, Bahamas, and Ria Mae. The podcast is just another feather in the multifaceted cap of Myles’ career, which includes numerous awards and accolades, a robust artist profile stateside, a 2018 children’s book called Santa Never Brings Me a Banjo, and the biggest-selling rap single in the history of Canadian music, “Inner Ninja,” a cross-genre musical collaboration with rapper Classified.

$35.00

An Evening with Mary Walsh

The Arden Theatre 5 St. Anne Street, St. Albert, Alberta

COMEDY/THEATRE Tuesday, October 25, 2022 7:30 P.M. Tickets starting at $46; prices do not include GST, handling charges, and fees. Cultural icon, comedian, social activist, and multi-Gemini Award winner Mary Walsh will perform a collection of her best comedic bits and profile some of her most popular characters from Dancing With Rage, CODCO, and the highly acclaimed series, This Hour Has 22 Minutes. Settle in for a tour-de-force evening of comedy.

$46.00

The Bros. Landreth

The Arden Theatre 5 St. Anne Street, St. Albert, Alberta

ROOTS/BLUES/ROCK Thursday, October 27, 2022 7:30 P.M. Tickets starting at $39; prices do not include GST, handling charges, and fees. The Bros. Landreth welcome a new day with Come Morning, an album that marks both a rebirth and refinement of the JUNO-winning band's blend of North American roots music and harmony-heavy soul. The most immersive, emotive record of the Landreths' career, Come Morning finds brothers Joey and Dave lacing their melody-driven songs with layers of atmospheric synth, organ, and textured guitar. The group's previous albums shone a light on their strength as a live act, capturing the spontaneity and sonic stomp of a band of hard-touring road warriors. If those records unfolded like snapshots of The Bros. Landreth's nighttime shows, then Come Morning sketches a markedly different picture, showcasing the introspection and clarity that comes with a long period of rest.? For Joey and Dave, rest wasn't always an easy thing to find. From their early days attending their father's gigs as babies ("Mom would take us in the bassinet and stick us under the bar tables," says David) to their years logged onstage and on the road, they've spent much of their lives being moved — both physically and emotionally — by music. After pursuing separate careers as sidemen, they launched The Bros. Landreth with 2013's?Let It Lie, a debut album that drew upon the shared soundtrack of their childhood — Bonnie Raitt's blues, Little Feat's funky country-rock, Ry Cooder's eclectic instrumentals, Lyle Lovett's twangy traditionalism — for a sound that saluted the past while planting its flag firmly in the present. This was music for the heart and the heartland, with songs that evoked the American South one minute and the windswept prairies of the brothers' Manitoba homeland the next.?Fittingly, the siblings spent years crisscrossing Canada and America in support of its release, then toured overseas as their popularity swelled. Let It Lie won the 2015 JUNO Award for "Roots & Traditional Album Of The Year - Group," earned The Bros. Landreth a nomination for "International Artist of the Year" at the 2016 UK Americana Music Awards, and received praise from heroes like Bonnie Raitt. Building a global audience took a toll on the brothers, though, and Dave temporarily stepped away from the lineup for three years. Joey used that time to launch a solo career, with albums like Whiskey and Hindsight cementing his reputation as a modern-day guitar hero. By the time the siblings reunited for their second album, '87, things had changed. "When we decided to record a sophomore album for The Bros.," Joey explains, "it was fraught with confusion, resentment, and tension. Dave and I both desperately wanted to get back to making music together, but there was a lot to unpack." '87 arrived in September 2019 and marked an expansion of the band's sound, but its accompanying tour was cut short by the Covid-19 pandemic. Deflated, Joey and Dave found themselves back home in Winnipeg, riding out the lockdown by funneling their energy into a new batch of recordings. For years, they'd begun each album the same way: by assembling a band and playing together in the studio, allowing their live performances to form the foundation of each song. It was an approach that highlighted the chemistry they'd sharpened on the road, but it didn't always encourage exploration or intentionality. With Come Morning, things were different. Forced to keep a tight circle due to Covid restrictions, Joey and Dave worked together in near-seclusion, pulling long hours in the studio and building songs one instrument at a time. They recorded, layered, stripped away, and layered again. Sounds were sampled, re-sampled, and twisted into something new. Prioritizing moody textures over fiery fretwork, Joey took an understated approach to the guitar, saving his big solos for key moments. He placed an equal emphasis on keyboards, beefing up the recordings with Hammond organ and analog synth. Slowly, steadily, the Landreths pieced together a transportive album built for the heart, the head, and the headphones. This time, the songs weren't the only thing telling a story; the sounds told a story, too. On "Stay," the two brothers — both of whom became first-time fathers shortly before Come Morning's creation — look for a balance between a touring musician's commitments to the road and a family man's priorities at home. "After the Rain," one of two songs co-written with Jonathan Singleton, finds them optimistically clinging to the silver linings that shine through the darkest of times, while "You Don't Know Me" mourns the loss of a friendship over achingly sparse percussion, soft swells of organ, and gorgeous pedal steel work from guest musician Joe Pisapia. With "Corduroy" and "Come Morning" — two songs about examining emotional damage to repair what's been broken — Joey and Dave even give a nod to their recent history of mending bridges. "The overarching theme here is hope," says Joey, who shared production duties with longtime collaborator, Murray Pulver. "Many of these songs lean into the tough stuff, like processing emotional trauma and finding strength on the other side. It's a bit of a myth that you're ever done working on that. Dave and I have just begun the journey, and that's why this record represents the rebirth we wanted '87 to be. We're working through the pain, processing it, unpacking our baggage, and beginning to move forward. Last time, we were just walking on a rug that had all kinds of stuff swept under it." Come Morning is a new dawn for The Bros. Landreth, featuring appearances from Leith Ross (whose 2020 debut was released on the Landreth's record label, Birthday Cake) and drummers Aaron Sterling and Daniel Roy. At the album's core are the Landreths themselves: two born-to-collaborate brothers who sing songs about hard truths and new beginnings, having been brought back together during a time of unprecedented isolation.

$39.00